These Humans

Steven Schild

the award-winning author of Eros in Autumn


When the poems in Steven Schild’s new collection are at their best (and his batting average is pretty darned good), they tackle our primary work: ‘being human,’ something that too often these days seems to be regarded as a sort of silliness. He writes, We kiss and commiserate / we cling without question to even our oddest others, / we comfort like angels, / like lower-case gods.  These poems celebrate at least as often as they mourn, soothe more than they fume. That the reader is allowed to participate in the journey is no small gift.—John Reinhard is the author of On the Road to Patsy Cline and Burning the Prairie.


These Humans is a symphonic presentation of us as a species. In parts 1-1V Schild examines us under the magnifying glass of the journalist he was and teacher he is—the images are clear, the language is crisp, and the lyricism is deft. There is a tone of disdain appropriate to the times in which we live; Schild presents the empirical evidence as he has witnessed it. In parts V and VI the voice of the poet takes over: the poems go much deeper to the soul of who we are. The responsible and articulate public witness becomes more personal, sharing (our) fears and vulnerabilities, our moments of joy and quiet delight. There is a balance in this book—of citizen and next-door-neighbor, of husband, son, grandson and father, of fellow traveler, of journalist and poet. And always the poetry exhibits an unerring ear. Thank you, Steve Schild for composing and sharing this orchestration!—Ken McCullough, Poet Laureate of Winona, Minnesota, is the author of Dark Stars and Broken Gates.

Lost Lake Folk Opera V5N1

Special Poets Laureate Issue

to celebrate the Fifth Anniversary of Folk Opera

 30 Stellar Contributors, including 6 past & present poets laureate


Poets Laureate
Joyce Sutphen • Minnesota Poet Laureate. Four Poems of the Road. Ken McCullough • Winona Poet Laureate. The Bear Husband – John Osa & Ursula. Rob Hardy • Northfield Poet Laureate. Three Poems – Rebecca, Jane & Light. Nicholle Ramsey • Winona Associate Laureate. Two Poems – Water and Sand. Jim Johnson • Duluth Laureate Emeritus. Two Trout Tales from Minnesota and Iowa. Emilio DeGrazia • Winona Laureate Emeritus. Late Thoughts – at the Mayo Clinic ER. 

Short fiction & essays                        

Anne Muccino. Dalia & J.T. Christopher Bremicker. Relapse. Justin Watkins. John Bass & other prose.  Jim Miles. My First Hunt. Steve Cooke. Lawn Adventures. Roger McKnight.Burnt Potatoes. John Torgrimson. Feast & Requiem. James Petrillo. Ashyer. Dan Coffey. Nowhere to Go. Nancy Palker. Zipper Lady. Ken Kakareka. Cabrón. Ken Fliés. Dog Days of Winter

Poetry                     

Steve McCown. Six Poems. Lee Henschel Jr. Forty Lenten Haiku. Tufik Y. Shayeb. Three Poems. Robert Wooten. Four Poems. Michael Ceraolo. Eighty Days. Kay Bosgraff. Three PoemsSteve Toth.Three Poems. Steve Schild. Three Poems. Ed Schwartz. Five Poems. Marcus Hines. Three Poems. Nicole Borg. Waiting for the Prince. Ken McCullough. The Levee: Then and Now


Everybody has one — Op-Ed                        

Tom Driscoll v5n2. My Crystal Ball

All Roads Lead Home

Nicole Borg


In her debut collection, All Roads Lead Home, Nicole Borg convinces us that poetry is the way our most important experiences may be best understood. Her voice has resonance and clarity, speaking not just for herself as woman, mother, wife, teacher and citizen, but for what is best in us. Her work reveals a heart fully alive, a mind in tune with moral responsibility, and a deft hand that chooses its words with care for their nuanced rhythms and sounds. Without mystifying or confusing us, her poems convey that the ordinary is special, and they challenge us to rediscover
the mystery in our lives.—Emilio DeGrazia, author of Eye Shadow (Rocket Science Press 2014).

Nicole Borg lets us ride shotgun on these road trips toward home. Home: where love and hope reside. Where we find what fills us. Where we are blessed by the moon and rooted in the stars. Borg leads us down a new path, and we’re richer
for having been on the road with her.—poet and editor Dara Syrkin.


This is a collection of sustaining drives across country and time with a woman who revisits herself, packing courage in a rusted suitcase that demands to be unlocked. The scenes along this road trip unfold risks she took to love, to be alone, to confess, and to maneuver herself into freedoms borne from raw storytelling. The poems often roll, subtly, to a surprise punch stop. The language draws a quick inhale from the fresh and sudden image of the truth that was waiting between the lines.—Stillwater poet and editor Elissa Cottle.


Amazon Reviews—
From Heidi P.: Thoroughly enjoying this book of poetry. I am currently rereading several of the poems, peeling back the layers of meaning. Poems should leave you with emotions to savor and Borg definitely writes with this in mind.

Folk Opera Fall – V4N2

Your Safety is Our Number One Priority

A fabulous anthology of poetry, short fiction and essays, opinion, photography and graphic arts

Featuring
Gun oil, hot metal and justice, 9 poems by Nicole Borg
Judy Garland’s Mother, short story by Konnie Ellis
As a man 2 short essays by John Torgrimson.
I know what’s coming, 4 poems by Andy Roberts
Solve for x, photography by Nathan Wagoner

Fiction and essays
Mr. Maryport Lee Henschel Jr.
Sold Jim Joe Ducato
The remarkable cat Daniel Moeller
Why? John Weiss
Mary Louise Kate Halverson
Sin and X C.J. Pickens
Rougher prose Carole Stoa Senn

Poetry
Try to stay alive David L. James
People lived here once Bart Sutter
Sisters paired Connie Sanderson
Paired sisters Nancy Kay Peterson
A wise fool’s song Robert Wooten
Another and better dream J. Niko Le
Rapier pen Mark Gaffney

Moral hazard Opinion by Tom Driscoll

Shamu, Splash & Solemn – Carole Stoa Senn

Emilio DeGrazia – Anne Gerber – Carole Stoa Senn

A riveting look of the creative writing and writing life of  Carole Stoa Senn

 

 

“Perhaps I have a need for much rougher prose or poetry than I had been anticipating. I’ve been wanting to write something jewel-like, but maybe what I want isn’t exactly the point.”  Carole Stoa Senn

“Carole’s story,” says Emilio DeGrazia in his introduction to this fascinating story, “is a necessarily fragmented account of how a talented and lovely young life was ravaged twice by violent attacks against which she had no way to defend herself.”


Amazon Reviews

Julia Schmitt writes: A story you need to read. Carole’s story is touching and inspirational. The structure of the book offers a multifaceted perspective on the incredible events of her life. An outstanding read.