Lost Lake Folk Opera V5N2

From deep inside the Polar Vortex – the Dark Ice of the Moon, Winter 2018-2019 issue.

 

Featuring
Short plays by Lee Gundersheimer & Emilio Regina
John Torgrimson from Guantanamo—On Asylum.
& Jon Welsh inside the State Funeral of
George Herbert Walker Bush Nametag Peggy by Dan Butterfass
Looking for a horse poem after an eye exam by Scott Lowery
Department of Catastrophe Management by Neale Torgrimson
Club of Stars, a fragment from the forthcoming memoir by Maria Sousa Hogan
Scott Lowery
Maria L. Sousa Hogan
Holly Day
Lee Gundersheimer
Christopher G. Bremicker
Andy Roberts
Tomer Klein
Dave Hunter
David Carkhuff
Dan Butterfass
Neale Torgrimson
Jim Johnson
Folk Opera Book Review—
Text for Our Nomadic Future, poems by Jim Johnson
Micheal Akutagawa
Hrithik Rana
G. L. Rockey
Jon Welsh
Wayne Farmer
John Torgrimson
Emilio Regina
Tom Driscoll

Glass Eater

Dan Coffey

Playwright, director and actor, Dan Coffey known for his work with Duck’s Breath Mystery Theater and portraying memorable characters like Dr. Science. Dan lives in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

 

Glass Eater is a wild, satiric hybrid, a book Hunter S. Thompson and Kurt Vonnegut might have collaborated on—set design by Graham Greene and Paul Theroux, special effects by Malcom Lowry.

Move over, Kurt Vonnegut! Dan Coffey’s wicked humor strikes again! The Glass Eater is about a burned-out con man knocking around the third world with some CIA types on his tail. Reduced to betting he can eat ashtrays for a living, our heart goes out to him when his Russian wife runs off with Dick Cheney. We discover Dick Nixon still lives—sort of—in a lab north of San Diego. Of course he’s still in touch with Henry Kissinger. And of course Condi Rice and Hillary have become pals in Coffey-world. In the end the Glass Eater uses his talents to save the world—maybe. Or will the world be saved by a man who builds glass towers? And whose side is Jesus on, anyway? You’ll find out reading The Glass Eater—sort of. —Terence A. Harkin, author of The Big Buddha Bicycle Race

Rumor has it that Dick Cheney has read the book and said:  Don’t buy this book.  And if you do, don’t read it!


Rejoyce says: The preeminent strength of Dan Coffey’s Glass Eater is voice. The main narrative is told in the baffled, idiomatic voice of the eponymous character who stumbles through Candide-like adventures, while plying his sideshow act to foot the bills. He is one of the MFA boat people, an economic refugee living outside the belly of the beast. Coffey, a graduate of the esteemed Iowa Writers Workshop, has a firm command of voice and much of this too-short, picaresque book is hilarious. Interspersed with the main story are secret memos by a cryogenically frozen Nixon, Bush Jr. and, you guessed it, The Donald. These are merely polemical. I wish the author had explored the deeper implications of the title, how it eats at the gut, how the price of the ticket may be too high. A short, fast, entertaining read, but might have been a minor classic.

Michael Morical: A Joyful Ride through Expat-dom. This book paints a hilarious portrait of a low-to-no-budget expat who eats glass for a living. Along the way, Coffey ties in bits by Richard Nixon (in an introduction written by Tricky Dick after his alleged death), Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger and other high-flying government flunkies. As funny as it is, Coffey makes serious points, so serious that Dick Cheney warns, in a blurb for the novel, “Don’t buy this book. If you do, don’t read it!” The author looks at expats who are scraping the bottom of the barrel, attracting as much attention to themselves as they can. The characters are rich. Through it all, Coffey maintains a uniquely entertaining perspective of life and politics. This is a joy to read and leaves me wanting more, a quality that I appreciate in a novel of any length. It is the perfect tonic for the times in which we live–laughter in the new dark age. Besides, you can learn how to eat glass, a valuable skill for digital nomads, expats or anyone who seeks to learn a trade in the world of brick and mortar.

From B.Leary: Move over, Kurt Vonnegut! Dan Coffey’s wicked humor strikes again! The Glass Eater is about a burned-out con man knocking around the third world with some CIA types on his tail. Reduced to betting he can eat ashtrays for a living, our heart goes out to him when his Russian wife runs off with Dick Cheney. We find out Nixon still lives—sort of—in a lab north of San Diego. Of course he’s still in touch with Henry Kissinger. And of course Condi Rice and Hillary have become pals in Coffey-world. In the end the Glass Eater uses his talents to save the world—maybe. Or will the world be saved by a man who builds glass towers? And whose side is Jesus on, anyway? You’ll find out reading The Glass Eater—sort of.

 

 
 
 

Lost Lake Folk Opera – V3N2

Special Winter Sun Issue

Featuring the Rural Economic Development Roundtable

held in Plainview, Minnesota, on December 1, 2015.


With Rochester and Mayo Clinic’s Destination Medical Center promising to alter the dynamics of small communities throughout southeast Minnesota, four individuals active in growing sustainable rural economies weigh-in on a wide range of issues.

Dean Harrington, Sheila Kiscaden, Gary Smith and John Torgrimson drill deep into the many issues affecting sustainable rural economic development. 

Contributors: Sheila Kiscaden. John Torgrimson. Gary Smith. Dean Harrington. Dan Munson. Roger C. Morris. Judi Bergen. Merle Hanson. Larry Johnson. John MacLean. Arnetta L. Lane. Andy Roberts. Sean Lause. Mark Metzler. Ron Hardy. Molly McDonald. Tom Farrell. Tom Driscoll.

Eye Shadow – Personal Essays

Emilio DeGrazia

   Emilio DeGrazia is one of those writers who loves the ambience of a writers’ gathering––the fraternity, the probing of ideas––whether the subject is poetry or the jock strap empire of sports. What I can tell you is that not many people I’ve read, whether in Minnesota or beyond, write of the human condition with the same mixture of discovery, forgiveness and judgment that Emilio brings from his study. Years ago a small group of us, at the prodding of the toastmaster, were asked to identify three or four people who would be our choice if we were marooned on a desert highland and had to spend foreseeable months or years listening to each other. My first choice was Emilio. I never tire of hearing what this man has to say about the humanity around him. —Jim Klobuchar, Author and retired columnist for the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Amazon Reviews—

Avid Reader writes: Ramblings. This short story collection is loosely grouped in eight categories: American Dreams, True Stories, Human Nature, College Education. Embracing Technology, Military Intelligence, Jock Strappings, and Moral Compass. Each category contains a definition and several stories regarding one aspect of the definition. Like any collection, some readers will like some stories more than others will. One unexpected delight is the artwork provided for one of the stories.

Green Blade 2015 Edition

The annual literary magazine of the Rural America Writers Center, Plainview, Minnesota, published through a special partnership with Shipwreckt Books.

 

Poetry            

Su Smallen

Dan Butterfass

Melissa McNallan

Nicole Borg

Susan McMillan

Emilio DeGrazia

Kit Rohrbach

Nancy Hengeveld

Jennifer Jesseph

Patricia Barone

Nicholas Ozment

Dee Bezoier

Kate Halverson

Betty J. Benner

Tim J. Brennan

Ken McCullough

Peter Allen

Steven R. Vogel

Prose

Peg Bauernfeind

Emilio DeGrazia

P.S. Duffy

Kit Rohrbach

Donna Halvorson

Benj Mahle

Craig Falkum

Peter Allen

Marcia Savela

Nancy Hengeveld

Nicholas Ozment

Tom Driscoll